Tofu Production

Production

Tofu is made by coagulating soy milk and pressing the resulting curds. Although pre-made soy milk may be used, most tofu producers begin with their own soy milk, which is produced by soaking, grinding, boiling, and straining dried (or, more rarely, fresh) soybeans.

Coagulation of the protein and oil (emulsion) suspended in the boiled soy milk is the most important step in the production of tofu. This process is accomplished with the aid of coagulants. Two types of coagulants (salts and acids) are used commercially [1]. The third type of coagulant, enzymes, is not yet used commercially but shows potential for producing both firm and “silken” tofu:

   1. Salt coagulants:

* Calcium sulfate (gypsum) and Calcium chloride: The traditional, and most widely used coagulant to produce Chinese style tofu. It produces a tofu that is tender but slightly brittle in texture. The coagulant itself has no perceivable taste. Use of this coagulant also makes a tofu that is rich in calcium, an important mineral for treating and preventing osteoporosis. As such, many tofu manufacturers choose to use this coagulant to be able to market their tofu as a good source of calcium.

* Magnesium chloride : The coagulant used to make Japanese style tofu with smooth and tender texture. In Japan, a white powder called nigari, which consists primarily of magnesium chloride, is produced from seawater after the sodium chloride is removed and the water evaporated. Depending on its production method, nigari may also contain small quantities of magnesium sulfate (Epsom salt), potassium chloride, calcium chloride, and trace amounts of other naturally occurring salts. Although the term nigari is derived from nigai, the Japanese word for “bitter”, neither nigari nor pure magnesium chloride imparts a perceivable taste to the finished tofu.
   2. Acid coagulants:
* Glucono delta-lactone (GDL): A naturally occurring organic acid also used in cheese making, which produces a very fine textured tofu that is almost jelly-like. This coagulant is used especially for “silken” and softer tofus, and confers a very slightly sour taste to the finished product.
   3. Enzyme coagulants:
* Among enzymes that have been shown to produce tofu are papain, and alkaline and neutral proteinases from microorganisms. In the case of papain, the enzyme to substrate ratio, by weight, was held constant at 1:400. An aliquot of 1% crude papain was added to “uncooked” soy milk at room temperature and heated to 90–100 celsius .

Contemporary tofu manufacturers may choose to use one or more of these coagulants, since they each play a role in producing a desired texture in the finished tofu[2]. Different textures result from different pore sizes and other microsopic features in tofus produced using each coagulant. The coagulant mixture is dissolved into water, and the solution is then stirred into boiled soy milk until the mixture curdles into a soft gel[1].

The curds are processed differently depending on the form of tofu that is being manufactured. For soft silken tofu (嫩豆腐; nèn doùfu) or tofu flower (豆花, dòuhuā) the soy milk is curdled directly in the tofu’s selling package. For standard firm Asian tofu, the soy curd is cut and strained of excess liquid using cheese cloth or muslin and then lightly pressed to produce a soft cake. Firmer tofus, such as Asian dry tofu (荳乾) or Western types of tofu, are further pressed to remove even more liquid. The tofu curds are allowed to cool and become firm. The finished tofu can then be cut into pieces, flavoured or further processed.

Although tartness is sometimes desired in dessert tofu, the acid used in flavouring is usually not the primary coagulant since it is not desirable to the flavour or texture of the resulting tofu to add it in a sufficiently high concentration as to induce coagulation. A sour taste in tofu and a slight cloudiness in its storing liquid is also usually an indication of bacterial growth and, hence, spoilage.

4 Comments

  1. Ramona said,

    April 19, 2010 at 3:21 pm

    hi
    can i use epsom salts – magnesium sulphate – as a coagulant when making tofu??
    thanx
    ramona

  2. January 8, 2011 at 6:55 pm

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